Sprint conspicuously absent from LTE-U debate

While the other big U.S. nationwide wireless operators have lodged their opinions in the great LTE-Unlicensed (LTE-U)/Licensed Assisted Access (LAA) debate, Sprint has been quiet on the topic. Of course, it's got plenty of other things going on, but it's somewhat curious because the company plays in both the Wi-Fi and LTE camps.

Qualcomm's 'Why Wait?' slogan gets put to the test

Qualcomm has seen its share of wireless technology wars, and it survived. Now it's got a new war on its hands, one involving LTE-U and Wi-Fi, as well as adversaries like Google. How will it survive this one? 

AT&T shows how serious it is about SDN, NFV and open source

In case there were any doubt, it's becoming clearer every day that it's no joke: That old, staid telecom giant known as AT&T is actually turning its engineering ship around in a big, big way, and it's not your grandfather's or grandmother's network anymore.

Google's Project Fi delivers some lessons about Wi-Fi calling and handoffs

With Google advancing its Project Fi and Apple preparing for the release of iOS 9 and its Continuity calling feature, the time seems right to see what's shaking in terms of Wi-Fi calling.

Thanks to Sprint, T-Mobile, Bright House and others, Wi-Fi's Passpoint standard comes of age

The Passpoint standard, introduced in 2012, promised to aggregate the fractured, splintered landscape of W-Fi hotspots into a unified system of connected networks that users could easily and seamlessly move among. And recent actions by T-Mobile US and Sprint indicate that at least some of the nation's biggest wireless carriers are using Passpoint to do just that.

As the (wireless) world turns, operators and vendors adjust to SDN, NFV

Now that the two largest wireless operators have reported their second-quarter earnings, it's a good time to start speculating how they might spend their budgets the rest of this year.

Google's Project Fi handoffs: Is it magic?

It's been less than a week since Google's Project Fi arrived at our door, but it's been enough time to come up with a few early impressions of the service. It's worth noting that there's still a "Project" in front of the endeavor.

With Wi-Fi, the mobile carrier of the future might be American Express, Facebook or Microsoft (or almost anyone)

Companies like Google, Republic Wireless and others are taking advantage of this trend by offering "Wi-Fi-first" service plans that push users' data traffic onto Wi-Fi networks if they are available, and fall back only to cellular when necessary (thereby keeping costs low). But such services may be the start of something much bigger.

Which academic institutions are leading in 5G?

While major wireless infrastructure and software vendors are devoting significant resources to the development of 5G, scores of academic institutions also are working hard to make contributions by way of research, experimentation and testbed facilities. That's why FierceWirelessTech decided to take a closer look at what some of them are doing in our latest feature, "Top 5 academic institutions leading in 5G research."

Is there an alternative to LTE-U/LAA that won't tick everyone off?

Given how much the industry has discussed LTE in unlicensed spectrum during the past several months or so, some stakeholders might have gotten the impression that all the questions have been asked and answered, thank you very much. But that's not the case.