3G handset reliability depends upon chipset selected, claims study

The ability of 3G phones to make and maintain calls can vary dramatically depending on which vendor's chipset is used. Tests carried out by Signals Research Group (SRG) showed that, despite 3G handsets passing industry-standard conformance testing needed for certification, major differences existed in voice call reliability and data-rate throughput for various chipsets under real-world, network conditions. "In some cases, the performance difference was in excess of 30 per cent of conformance standard specs," said Michael Thelander, CEO of SRG.

"The results clearly illustrate that testing chipsets and device performance beyond minimum certification requirements uncovered performance differences which can significantly affect a subscriber's satisfaction with a particular device."

The study looked at the performance of 3G chipsets from Ericsson Mobile Platforms, Icera, Infineon, InterDigital, Motorola, NEC, Nokia and Qualcomm. According to SRG, out of the total of 16 test scenarios Icera rated highest in 10 of 12 set-ups involving more challenging network conditions.

For more on this story:
EE Times

Related stories:
Qualcomm launches platform for low-cost 3G Internet devices
3G props up falling mobile handset market

Suggested Articles

Wireless operators can provide 5G services with spectrum bands both above and below 6 GHz—but that doesn't mean that all countries will let them.

Here are the stories we’re tracking today.

The 5G Mobile Network Architecture research project will implement two 5G use cases in real-world test beds.