Baidu seeks Android, Symbian search deals

Chinese search leader Baidu is seeking to strike deals to put its search box on all of the major handset operating systems.
 
In a sign that competition in Chinese language search is moving rapidly to the mobile device, CEO Robin Li has revealed the company is now looking to work with the Google-backed Android. 
 
Li told the WSJ that Baidu's goal was to place “a search box very prominently on the phone's screen.”
 
Baidu already has an agreement with China Unicom to provide search on the iPhone in China, while last month it said it would set up a joint laboratory with Symbian Foundation to bring its “box computing” search concept to Nokia handsets. 
 
A company spokesperson said Baidu was engaged in talks with a number of major handset providers across all operating platforms to become the default search provider.
 
Nasdaq-listed Baidu is also considering a possible listing on China’s domestic stock exchange, the spokesman said. 

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