Court gives split ruling on Qualcomm, Broadcom patent dispute

US firm Qualcomm violated parts of a patent held by chip designer Broadcom that helps cell phones conserve battery power when out of network coverage, an Associated Press report said.

 

The Associated Press report, quoting Charles E. Bullock, an administrative law judge hearing the case in Washington on behalf of the International Trade Commission, said that Qualcomm however did not infringe two other patents on chips used in cell phones and other wireless devices.

 

Qualcomm had challenged the patents held by Broadcom, but the judge ruled all three patents were valid, the report said.

 

The case was brought to the commission by Broadcom, which is based in Irvine, California, the report said.

 

Qualcomm, based in San Diego, said it would appeal the decision to the full commission as it explored designs to replace the disputed technology, the report said.

 

The judge's ruling will go to the full commission next year for a final determination.

Broadcom said it would ask the commission to review the portion of the ruling that favored Qualcomm.

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