Dell teams with Intel on big data

Dell, Intel and Revolution Analytics have jointly launched a Big Data Innovation Center in Singapore.
 
The new center will provide training programs, proof-of-concept capabilities and solution development support on big data and predictive analytic innovations for Asian customers. The facility aims to speed application development for anticipated demand in Asia's Big Data market.
 
The Big Data Innovation Center will be housed at the Dell Solution Center (DSC) in Singapore, where training will be done on a big data stack that includes Dell infrastructure using Intel servers, 10GbE networking gear and SSDs.
 
Revolution Analytics will also use the center to provide a big data analytics platform to train professionals to become data scientists.
 
The center will provide a platform for companies to test-run big data initiatives and proof-of-concepts for deployment. It will also see the commencement of training where participants will be equipped with the necessary skills to improve the quality of data mining across a wider range of platforms from a larger pool of sources. Apart from the regular training courses, candidates can also attend seminars, workshops and events hosted at the Dell Solution Center.
 
 
IDC predicts the global big data technology and services market will grow at CAGR of 31.7% through to 2016, to reach $23.8 billion. This would be about seven times the rate of growth for the overall ICT market. IDC expects big data spending in Asia-Pacific excluding Japan to reach $603 million in 2013, up 42.6% over 2012.
 
“The global market for big data analytics is growing at a rapid pace, and businesses in Singapore are uniquely suited to capitalize on this trend,” said Laurence Liew, managing director of Revolution Analytics Asia-Pacific.
 
“The launch of the Big Data Innovation Center is in line with the Singapore government's focus on big data and predictive analytics, and we are pleased to partner with Dell and Intel and as our big data analytics training platform.”

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