The great broadband switchover - Part II

I’m less than four days away from the start of my new broadband service and, frankly, I’m deeply worried.
 
There’s still no word from my new provider on the precise activation date, despite being promised a call back with the details. Considering I’m not technically a customer yet, this doesn’t fill me with confidence about how future queries will be handled.
 
Similarly, there’s no sign of the new wireless router that comes as part of the package, though I guess that’s not exactly hard to set up once it does arrive.
 
One final twist from my outgoing supplier, though. Apparently I need to apply to them to have an overpayment for October refunded. My bill covers me until October 31, you see, meaning I’ve paid for four days I’ll never get to use.
 
Just to clarify that – I have to ask the firm for a refund. I have never heard of any other service industry that works in this way and am truly shocked that, in an age where traditional ISPs and telcos face challenges from over-the-top players, any firm would risk generating such a negative feeling from a consumer.
 
I also wonder how many customers don’t ask for the refund, and what impact that has on the firm’s balance sheet. Any details welcome.
 
UPDATE: My new provider has let me know by e-mail that the service will be up and running Friday 28th – the same day the old supplier is set to cut it off – so all should be well. We’ll see.

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