It's holiday time, so put that BlackBerry down

It's the silly season, meaning that news is thin on the ground as Europe departs en masse for its summer break. Thank goodness for Xavier Niel, who is busy making waves on both sides of the Atlantic this August and providing good fodder for stories in what is normally a pretty quiet period.

I'm off myself for a little break in the sun, meaning that there will also be a break in the editor's corner for a week, although of course you will still be served your regular supply of news from the trusty FierceWireless:Europe and FierceWireless team.

It's also at times like these when it really hits home how much the wonderful world of technology has changed forever even simple tasks such as packing. I don't know about you, but I used to take anything up to 10 books on a two-week holiday, not to mention a few CDs or tapes (oh yes, tapes) along with a rather cumbersome music player or speakers to ensure maximum holiday entertainment.

Now, I have an e-reader and a mobile phone-cum-radio/music player/weather forecaster/TV/general provider of information. In other words, I can fit everything I could possibly need, apart from the odd few garments and a toothbrush, into my pocket. All I need then is a good Wi-Fi connection, which still often fails to live up to expectation in hotels, airports and other public areas, or a good roaming package, which are certainly becoming increasingly available within Europe.

Holidays are a good time to really test the boundaries of your personal technology needs as you search for connectivity to download that latest novel or listen to a radio programme or watch TV by the pool. However, avoiding those work emails is perhaps almost impossible for some, but it's good to try! That's where technology perhaps lets us down, by making us feel we should always be available to answer that email.

My challenge to you is to switch off that work email for a week. Can you do it? Will the world collapse around you if you don't? Maybe give it a try and see what happens.

Whatever you do, have a wonderful and--here's hoping--restful break.--Anne

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