LTE device testing enters crucial phase

The next twelve months will be crucial for LTE device testing, as the first handsets running dedicated silicon are launched, Richard Jacklin, business development director at test house Anite claims.
 
Speaking to TelecomsEurope.net during the Mobile World Congress, Jacklin said that current test cases have been developed for devices using legacy chipsets, but that increasing integration of baseband processors into the silicon is powering a new wave of test capabilities.
 
However, as with so many new mobile technologies in the past, the test firm faces a chicken and egg scenario, whereby it cannot develop new test cases until the first new devices are made available to it. “Device availability has been the issue,” Jacklin explains, adding. “We’re looking at LTE Advanced, but do we have anything to test against?”
 
Anite has just announced testing deals with Telefonica Germany and China Mobile, highlighting its ability to work with all flavors of LTE technology. “TDD is very close to parity with FDD,” Jacklin notes, explaining that the same test cases can be applied to both versions of the 4G tech.
 
LTE-Advanced aside, Jacklin notes that test cases for LTE itself are now well established, mostly as a result of more devices becoming available, which satisfies the firm’s aim to be first to market with new test capabilities. Development of those test cases is only possible through “collaboration with major device and chip vendors, and many leading operators too,” Jacklin notes.

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