Mobile operators too haphazard with service deployments

Mobile operators have been losing out on revenue due to their haphazard approach to launching services, according to network testing company Ixia.

Speaking to Total Telecom at Broadband World Forum Europe in Paris, Ixia's CEO Atul Bhatnagar said operators have not given enough thought to the impact that deploying a new service could have on their live networks.

"There has been too much trial and error, it's bad for churn – their approach needs to be more methodical," he said.

"People are only willing to pay for services if they are reliable," he said.

Bhatnagar commented that mobile operators need good pre and post-deployment testing technologies to cope with the increasing complexity in the last mile.

"Everything that has happened and will happen on wireline networks will happen more quickly on the mobile side," he said.

"The next generation of mobile devices will have more features and will be capable of delivering more services… [But] soon it won't be just video and gaming anymore, operators will need to deliver something more critical, like remote medical services… and remote education services," he said.

Ixia on Monday launched a range of end-to-end testing solutions specifically for high-speed mobile networks, including 3G LTE.

It acquired the new tools when it bought wireless network testing specialist Catapult Communications in May 2009, in a deal valued at $105 million.

Ixia's latest products are aimed at helping mobile operators as they make the transition from 3G to next-generation networks.

"The challenge for mobile operators is to be a high-velocity, highly profitable business that provides a good end user experience – that's easy to say but hard to deliver," said Bhatnagar.

This article originally appeared on Total Telecom

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