News in brief Opera, Pacific Crossing, Telekom Austria, ITU

Opera Software announced it will unveil its Opera Mobile 9.7 server-accelerated browser for smartphones and mobile devices during next week's CTIA Wireless 2009 event. According to the browser development firm, Opera Mobile 9.7 features Opera Turbo, which compresses data up to 80 percent to reduce unwanted traffic and congestion and extend mobile web access regardless of network limitations.

The board of Pacific Crossing, operator of the second largest transpacific fibre optic cable, will meet this week to consider bids for the company - a transaction that would mark the end of a speculative era for infrastructure assets in the region.

According to two people close to the sale process, NTT Communications, a unit of Japanese telecommunications group Nippon Telegraph and Telephone, and Hong Kong-based Pacnet, operator of the largest regional submarine cable network, each tendered bids of $80m-$90m ahead of the auction's close on Friday in New York. The sale is being run by Blackstone, the private equity firm.

The Austrian cartel court has sentenced Telekom Austria to a fine of €1.5 million for abusing its significant market power. The claim was filed by the federal competition office BWB and the verdict is final, as Telekom Austria and the BWB cannot appeal. Neither Telekom Austria and BWB would not comment on the verdict, which did not disclose exactly why the operator was fined, but the Austrian press speculates that it concerns the operator's bundled fixed, mobile and internet service, launched in 2007.

Standardised methodologies for calculating the impact of ICT) in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have been proposed by an ITU Focus Group meeting in Hiroshima, Japan.

The ITU-T Focus Group on ICTs and Climate Change, a global group comprising some of the world's leading ICT players, has developed a method for calculating two elements: how to measure and reduce green house gas emissions. It will be reporting on agenda discussed at the summit shortly.

 

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