News In Brief: Telenor, Facebook, Qualcomm, Verizon, Bing, Bellsystem24, MS, Gulf Bridge International

Telenor has appointed Richard Olav Aa as CFO and executive VP . Olav Aa joins the carrier from Arendals Fossekompani where he was investment director.

The man behind Facebook’s iPhone app, Joe Hewitt, has quit the project due to a philosophically objection to Apple’s onerous review process. Hewitt told TechCrunch: “I am philosophically opposed to the existence of their review process. I am very concerned that they are setting a horrible precedent for other software platforms, and soon gatekeepers will start infesting the lives of every software developer.”
 
Japan's telecom ministry has selected Qualcomm's MediaFLO technology, and ISDB-Tmm - an evolution of the nation's digital TV standard - as the official mobile TV technologies.
 
Verizon Wireless will start sending “copyright notices” on behalf of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) to subscribers suspected of illegally downloading songs from this week. The letter will urge users to delete the content they distribute, but does not include threats of potential service interruptions as a penalty.
Microsoft has officially launched Bing in the UK, but with limited functionality compared to the US version. The UK version does not currently include Twitter feeds or Wolfram Alpha, both of which were recently announced by Microsoft and are available in the US.
 
Private investment firm Bain Capital has bought Citigroup's controlling stake in Japan's largest call center operator, Bellsystem24, for 100 billion yen ($1.11 billion).
 
Microsoft is offering a free trial of the cloud-based Microsoft Online Services in 36 countries, in advance of the suite's commercial launch in 1H10.
 
Qatar-based Gulf Bridge International (GBI) and Iraq Telecommunications and Post Company (ITPC) will establish a hub for GBI’s $445 million (€297m) submarine cable network that will cover many Middle East nations and link East Asia and Europe. The project will be operational by 2011.

 

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