Nokia urges Linux developers to learn cell phone business model

While only having one platform using Linux--its N800 tablet series--Nokia has called upon the Linux community to better understand how the mobile handset business works if they're interested in becoming involved.

Ari Jaaksi, Nokia's VP of software and head of its open-source operations, confirmed that the company wanted to help open-source developers enter the cell phone market, but stressed that there were certain business rules that needed to be understood, "such as DRM, IPR, SIM locks and the subsidised business model."

Jaaksi admitted that concepts like these "go against the open-source philosophy", but said they were necessary components of the current mobile industry. "Some of these things harm the industry but they're here, as things stand. These are touchy, emotional issues, but this dialogue is very much needed. As an industry, we plan to use open-source technologies, but we are not yet ready to play by the rules; but this needs to work the other way round too."

However, adopting the corporate line, Jaaksi also confirmed that Symbian, the proprietary operating system in which Nokia has a major share, would still in years to come be the best platform on which to create smartphones.

For more on this story:
- read ZD Net

Related stories:
Nokia denies shift towards Linux handsets. Nokia/Linux story
How big can mobile Linux get? Editorial

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