Samsung Galaxy S2 specs leaked?

Whispers of the Samsung Galaxy S2 have emerged, which could prove very exciting if true. Sources say it is rumored for release early in the new year and will take the already impressive Galaxy S handset and its variants into the next generation of smartphone technology.
 
A picture was also leaked, though at this stage it is hard to tell whether it's real and if there's any credence to the speculation. The specs are hugely impressive but they're not impossible and are inline with other rumored next-generation smartphones. 
 
First on the spec list is a 2GHz Hummingbird CPU coupled with 1GB of RAM. Not a dual core chip like other potential offerings this means it might not be as good at multitasking but will certainly deliver plenty of raw power.
 
Also said to feature in the phone is 4GB ROM, and 32GB of internal memory, expandable to 64GB with a Micro SD card. Like the other Galaxy S devices it will have a large 4.3-inch super AMOLED display with a 1280x720 resolution as well as GPS,
 
Bluetooth 3.0 and Wi-Fi connectivity. Anyone wishing to take pictures with the device will be able to enjoy an 8mp camera with the ability to record HD video.
 
For Android fans out there the Galaxy S2 will be running the Gingerbread build of Google's OS which should be released early next year.
 
If the supposed render is to be believed then the S2 will be mostly screen, with the usual navigation buttons at bottom of its rectangular form factor. Some doubt how genuine the picture is, though at least the specs are believable.
 
It was recently announced that Samsung had sold 5 million Galaxy S handsets in just two months equaling its total smartphone sales in 2009.

This article originally appeared in Rethink Wireless 

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