Samsung on track to sell a million Galaxy Tabs

Samsung should easily reach its target of selling 1 million Galaxy Tabs by the end of the year.
 
The figure for the first month of sales [is] a quite impressive 600,000 units.
 
Despite concerns that the device might be overpriced, it has proved it itself as one of the most successful tablets so far, [sitting] comfortably behind the iPad, which sold one million units in its first month.
 
The gap may be significant, but compared to other tablet makers such as HP - which is struggling to keep up with demand for 9,000 of its Slate 500 device - it seems more impressive.
 
Even with its specs - which have rapidly been replicated and improved upon by promised upcoming tablets - and criticism about its seven-inch form factor, [the Galaxy Tab] has done surprisingly well.
 
To recap, it features a 1GHz ARM Cortex A8 processor with 512MB of RAM and a choice of 16 or 32GB of internal storage. The webcam is 1.3 megapixels and the rear facing camera 3 megapixels.
 
With a slew of more reasonably-priced devices on the way that don't require the consumer to buy a data plan, it would seem the Galaxy branding has won customers over.
 
The fact that the release of the new version of Android is only weeks away...hasn't deterred early adopters - even though most devices set to be released in early 2011, such as Motorola's flagship tablet, will be running the new platform.
 
If the price of the Galaxy Tab is still too much for some people there are signs that it is coming down. On Amazon UK a contract-free version of the device can be picked up for £469 (€555) although the US is still getting the better deal.
 
The device is currently available from the big four carriers in the US and is consistently priced at $600 (€450) contract-free and $400 on a contract, with the exception of AT&T which offers the device contract-free for $650."
 
Original Article URL:
Samsung shifts 600,000 Galaxy Tabs

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