T-Systems, Intel build "data center of the future"

T-Systems and Intel have set up what they say is the world’s first experimental green data center in Bavaria, Germany.
 
They will publish their initial findings later this year, which they hope will drive future data center upgrades.
 
“This project is the first and only one worldwide that is devoted completely to the issue of energy efficiency in data centers,” said Olaf Heyden, T-Systems director and head of ICT Operations. “Since the energy consumption of data centers worldwide is on the rise, the analysis will play a key role in minimizing CO2 emissions and lowering costs.”
 
The DataCenter 2020 test center, roughly 70 sq meters, with an equipment room of the same size, are located in the T-Systems data center at Euroindustriepark.
 
One of goals of the project is to reach a power usage effectiveness value (PUE) of 1.3. The PUE measures the ratio of total energy consumed in a data center to energy used purely for computer operation. Typically, data centers today achieve PUEs of between 1.7 and 1.8.
 
The project is the first in a series aimed at extracting the greatest amount of energy and cost savings out of ICT products and solutions.
 
It includes a ceiling height that can be adjusted from 2.5 meters to 3.7 meters and a smoke generator that makes air flows visible. Intel is providing about 180 servers for the project, while Deutsche Telekom’s corporate customer arm will supply the network infrastructure.
 
“Roughly 10 employees from each company are analyzing the interaction of various elements in the data center, taking a holistic view of energy considerations – including not only servers but also such elements as recirculating coolers, room size and ceiling heights or water circuits,” T-Systems said.
 
The German IT and managed services firm said it would invest “single-digit millions” in the project.
 
Christian Morales, vice president sales and marketing for Intel, said the aim was to “draft a plan for developing, building and running a 'data center of the future'.”
 
Meanwhile, Fujitsu has released a data center energy and carbon calculator.
 
Developed by Fujitu’s European Laboratories in conjunction with the Carbon Trust, Fujitsu says the tool enables center operators to analyze energy use and carbon emissions and identify potential reductions, Fujitsu said.

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