UK smartphone users spend £581m using apps

Smartphone owners in the UK are spending £581 million a year via downloaded apps. Research conducted by OnePoll on behalf of the marketing firm The Bio Agency, found that 20 per cent of UK smartphone users purchased goods by using applications, spending on average over £33 per person.

The survey of 3,000 UK residents also established that nearly 80 per cent voted convenience as the major reason for conducting m-commerce. The most popular purchasing category was groceries with an average spend of over £75 a month, with buying travel tickets the next most popular at over £56 a month.

Commenting on these results, as reported by NMA, Peter Veash, managing director of The Bio Agency, said, "The message for brands is clear: utilise mobile or lose a huge area of potential growth. Our research suggests that almost 40 per cent of smartphone users will choose a new handset based on whether or not certain applications are available."

In February, the giant retailer Tesco announced that it would consolidate its mobile app portfolio to three or less, and focus its development on tablet devices in 2011.

Tesco's head of research and development, Nick Lansley, said that the company's mobile apps had generated in excess of two million downloads to date, and searches using the Tesco Finder app were peaking at ten a second, according to a report in Marketing Week.

For more:
- see this NMA article
- see this Marketing Week article

Related Articles:
Mobile commerce: Retailers' readiness lags consumer demand
European m-commerce adoption remains low, claims study
M-Commerce: Everything Everywhere behind advertiser, retailer initiative
NFC's momentum is growing but consumers are wary

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