What would a combined Sprint and T-Mobile look like?

As rumors heat up that Sprint is poised to make a public bid for T-Mobile, analysts and others are beginning to look at what the two carriers would look like if they merged.

While there are still significant obstacles to such a deal--regulators have signaled their opposition to the transaction, which could kill the deal outright or at least lead to significant asset divestments--it's nonetheless worth looking at what kind of network and financial situation a combined Sprint and T-Mobile would command. 

Below is a snapshot of the network of a combined Sprint and T-Mobile, as well as a customer and financial comparison of a combined Sprint and T-Mobile against market leaders Verizon Wireless and AT&T Mobility.

Sprint and T-Mobile's aggregate spectrum holdings:

Source: Mosaik. Click here for a larger version of this image.

Sprint and T-Mobile's network coverage overlap:

Source: Mosaik. Click here for a larger version of this image.

Sprint and T-Mobile's subscriber base:

Source: Strategy Analytics

Sprint and T-Mobile's EBITDA margin:

Source: Strategy Analytics

Sprint and T-Mobile's service revenue:

Source: Strategy Analytics

Sprint and T-Mobile's smartphone share of postpaid subscribers:

Source: Strategy Analytics

Finaly, BTIG analyst Walter Piecyk offered a look at where Sprint and T-Mobile stand today in terms of 2013 wireless EBITDA: 

Source: Piecyk

What would a combined Sprint and T-Mobile look like?
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