Allot cites problems when bandwidth allocation does not suit mobile video requirements

The latest version of Allot Communications' trends report on mobile video found that the actual bandwidth being allocated by a particular mobile network in a developed country had no correlation to video stream requirements, which portends some unfortunate consequences given that the vendor also discovered having insufficient allocated bandwidth for a video session will result in video stalls.

Other findings include the fact that laptops using dongles experience more video stalls than smartphones, but laptop users are apparently a more patient lot because they will continue watching a video for longer durations, regardless of stalls. However, the more a user watches a video over a wireless connection, the more likely his or her frustration level may rise, because Allot discovered videos watched for longer durations are likely to have more stalls.

On average, a mobile video viewer downloads video content using nearly 1.46 Mbps bandwidth over 157 seconds, the report said.

Allot developed its conclusions based upon a sample of 300,000 video detail records from a given week on one mobile network in an unspecified developed country during December 2013. For more information on Allot's findings, see this release.

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