Axell DAS supports first responders at World Trade Center complex

The newly constructed World Trade Center complex in New York City also has a new distributed antenna system (DAS)  that was installed by Axell Wireless to support a bevy of public-safety users. More than five miles of high-capacity optical fiber was laid to create what is the largest U.S. public-safety DAS, Axell said.

One World Trade Center DAS

One World Trade Center

The WTC complex includes One World Trade Center, the tallest building in the United States at 1,776 feet and the fourth tallest in the world. The One WTC deployment was implemented by Axell and TechMer, a subsidiary of The Mer Group.

TechMer and North American Mobile Systems formed a joint venture that won an $11.8 million contract from the New York/New Jersey Port Authority in 2012 for a first responders system and a base building and tenant two-way radio system for One WTC, which is known colloquially as "Freedom Tower."

The new DAS also covers surrounding buildings, including the World Trade Center hub, pavilion, vehicle security center roadway (shopping malls and transportation center for the complex), museum and memorial. Those sites were implemented by Pinnacle Wireless and Axell.

The DAS deployment consists of Axell's optical master unit (OMU) fiber headend units, directional couplers, VHF filters and distribution amplifier packages covering 88 channels for UHF, VHF and 800 MHz frequency bands.

The system supports New York City police, transit police, New York fire department, Homeland Security and other federal and state organizations responsible for emergency services, plus first responders in New York City and nearby jurisdictions. 

For more:
- see this Axell release

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Madden: DAS is under-hyped
AT&T, Verizon and others ride the DAS wave
Cobham snaps up Axell Wireless

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