Bytemobile unveils adaptive traffic management system for mobile networks

Mobile video optimization company Bytemobile announced a new product line designed to manage all mobile IP network traffic on a single platform. That means the company has incorporated a number of network optimization methods in one platform to reduce network capex and improve quality of service, said Ronny Heraldsvik, vice president of marketing with Bytemobile.

"We've been in development for two years, bringing together network elements to give operators more intelligence to do more adaptive things on the fly," Heraldsvik said in an interview with FierceBroadbandWireless. "DPI (deep packet inspection), load balancing, video optimization, analytics and global network intelligence are all in one network element to reduce cost and give operators better insight into congestion."

The product series--called the T3000 Adaptive Traffic Management System--can reduce an operator's total cost of ownership for traffic management by up to 50 percent within months of deployment, Bytemobile said. Through the use of adaptive traffic management and auto-tunable traffic control features, the T3100 improves the utilization and performance of existing network capacity by 30-50 percent, the company added.

In conjunction with the announcement, Bytemobile announced the general availability of its first T3000 Series product, the T3100 Adaptive Traffic Manager. Bytemobile said the product can detect and react to network conditions in three key areas: the cell, radio access network and the network core.

For more:
- see this release

Related articles:
Mobile video viewership on the upswing, but how can carriers keep pace?
Study: Video accounts for up to 60 percent of mobile data traffic
MWC Preview: LTE-Advanced, HSPA, video optimization to anchor networks news

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