Google apologizes for user-created map content; Apple Watch teardown reveals sensors to measure blood oxygen

Wireless tech news from across the web:

> Googler Dan Fredinburg, who had worked on the self-driving car and Project Loon projects, was among those killed after an earthquake set off an avalanche at the base camp on Mount Everest. Article (sub. req.)

> Nokia has dismissed claims that suggested the company was planning a big return to the smartphone business next year. Article

> Google apologizes for crude user-created content on its maps. Article

> The Communications Authority of Kenya has given mobile operators Airtel and Telkom Kenya (Orange) approval to start testing 4G technology using their current spectrum allocations, Business Daily reports. Article

> SoftBank Corp. executive Nikesh Arora says he's having a lot of fun working with his friend Masayoshi Son, the billionaire entrepreneur and founder of Japan's SoftBank. Article (sub. req.)

> Eyewear maker Luxottica says the next Google Glass is coming soon. Article

> Portugal's National Communications Authority has launched a public consultation on the availability of spectrum in the 3.4-3.8 GHz frequency band. Post

> Scratch Wireless weighs in on why Google's Project Fi could be the beginning of the end for Verizon and AT&T. Commentary

> A teardown of the Apple Watch by iFixit reveals that the device contains the sensors needed to measure blood oxygen levels, not just heart rate. Article

And finally… Robert Downey, Jr. doesn't seem to be all that excited about Apple's new watch. Article

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