NTIA: Second-round broadband stimulus applications total $11B

The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced it received 867 applications totaling $11 billion in proposed funding for broadband projects in the second round of the agency's broadband stimulus funding process.

NTIA said applications came in from a diverse range of parties including state, local, and tribal governments; nonprofits; industry; anchor institutions, such as libraries, universities, community colleges, and hospitals; public safety organizations; and other entities in rural, suburban, and urban areas.
 
"For the second round of BTOP funding, we sharpened our program focus and encouraged applicants to create comprehensive proposals to meet the needs of their communities. We are pleased that a high percentage of applicants appear to have met our priorities and we look forward to reviewing this more targeted pool of applications," said Lawrence Strickling, NTIA administrator. "We will move quickly but carefully to fund the best projects to bring broadband and jobs to more Americans."

While a preliminary analysis of applicant-reported data shows that NTIA received requests for grants totaling more than $11 billion, including about $4.5 billion in non-federal matching funds committed by the applicants, bumps that amount up to $15.5 billion in proposed broadband projects. NTIA said it will employ a thorough review process with the goal of making the initial second-round grant awards this summer.
 
For more:
- see this release

Related articles:
Libraries, community colleges vie for additional broadband funding
U.S. Government doles out initial broadband stimulus awards
NTIA, RUS flooded with broadband stimulus applications totaling $28 billion
NTIA, RUS delay broadband grant awards
NTIA to begin awarding broadband stimulus grants in November
Broadband stimulus: Clarity is needed, say service providers
NTIA reports strong interest in broadband funding applications

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