Sprint: We are ready for iPhone data deluge

Sprint Nextel (NYSE:S) executives told analysts on Friday that it is ready to handle the jump in data traffic that is expected to come from the Apple iPhone--even as it moves network technologies around the accommodate its LTE plans.

"We believe we can handle the demand of the iPhone by our proactive work in optimizing content," said  Sprint's president of network operations Steve Elfman. "We're very happy with that."

Sprint is the only U.S. operator selling the iPhone with an unlimited data plan.

Speaking at the PCIA 2011 Wireless Infrastructure Show in Dallas earlier this month, Sprint senior vice president of networks Bob Azzi praised Ericsson (NASDAQ:ERIC), which manages Sprint's network, for its ability to respond to the network capacity demands of smartphone users and stay ahead of growth.

Sprint said it will introduce LTE in its 5 x 5MHz swathe of 1900 MHz spectrum initially, with plans to introduce service in mid-2012. It will continue to move off CDMA carriers from the 1900 MHz band to make more room for LTE. CDMA will then be deployed in the 800 MHz band where Sprint is dismantling its iDEN network. Sprint also plans to employ Wi-Fi offload strategies, sell more femtocells and incorporate more network optimization products to deal with traffic.

For more:
- see this Computerworld article

Related articles:
Sprint executive credits Ericsson with company's ability to handle data traffic growth
Ericsson takes over Sprint's day-to-day operations
Report: Sprint buys 30.5 million Apple iPhones over four years
Questions, concerns surround Sprint-Ericsson tie-up
Sprint inks $5B network outsourcing deal with Ericsson
Sprint in 'final negotiations' on Ericsson outsourcing

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