Ubiquiti shows 900 MHz mini-PCI radio module

Here is a clever solution from a very young start-up (with a catchy company motto: "Think Outside the Band"). San Jose, CA-based Ubiquiti Networks, founded in 2005, unveiled a high-power 900 MHz mini-PCI radio module for wireless mesh networking applications based on its patent-pending Frequency Freedom technology. The SuperRange9 (SR9) features 700mW output power capability, -93dBm receive sensitivity, advanced noise mitigation functionality and data throughput of up to 54 Mbps in OFDM mode. The speed is similar to that of 802.11g, but the operation in the 900 MHz band offers improved range over standard 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz 802.11 solutions in obstacle-rich environments such as metropolitan areas.

The SR9 uses an Atheros AR5213 802.11 MAC/BB IC and is thus compatible with existing Atheros drivers, including the open-source Linux MADWIFI driver. The use of the Atheros chip provides other Atheros features such as 5/10/20 MHz selectable transmit bandwidth, Xtended range and advanced security protocols such as WPA2. Ubiquiti describes its Frequency Freedom technology as using "non-standard radio integration and firmware design" and standard 802.11 silicon to create a radio platform capable of operating at frequencies up to 60 GHz.

Ubiquiti is targeting WISPs and mesh networking vendors with the SR9, which is fully functional using standard existing 802.11 drivers and comes with FCC modular certification approval. Mountain View, CA-based broadband CPE ODM Peplink says that its multi-SSID AP, PolePoint and municipal WiFi CPE, Surf, will support 900 MHz operation using the SR9.

Read more about Ubiquiti's technology:
- at the company's site

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