Verizon: LTE modem users may experience 3G to LTE handoff delay

Verizon Wireless (NYSE:VZ) said its LTE USB modem users may experience up to a two-minute delay when switching from its 3G network onto the LTE network that was rolled out in 38 markets Dec. 5.

A company spokesman told Computerworld that Verizon is working on a fix. He also said the operator is working on adding drivers for the USB modems so they can work on Mac OS-based laptops.

Chief Technology Officer Tony Melone, in a conference call with analysts and reporters Dec.1, indicated data traffic moving from LTE to 3G networks would experience a smooth handover. But coming the other direction, from 3G to LTE, users would stay on the 3G connection until they stop transmitting data.  

Since launching its LTE network, Verizon reports no problems with the LTE network and that it has been transmitting data at advertised speeds--5 Mbps to 12 Mbps. Some users in Boston have reported downloads up to 20 Mbps and uploads of 5 Mbps on the network, which has few users at this point.  

A tester in San Francisco wrote in Business Insider that he had to unplug the modem and plug it back in to get the modem to move off the 3G network and back onto the LTE network. Verizon says that action is not necessary, but users might have to wait up to two minutes. Business Insider said the hand-off problem happened with the LG USB model. Verizon is selling two USB modems, one from LG and the other from Pantech.

Verizon is offering two simple data plans: $50 for 5 GB of data per month and $80 for 10 GB of data. If subscribers go over their data allotments, they pay an extra $10 for each 1 GB of data.

For more:
- see this Computerworld article
- read this Business Insider article

Related articles:
Verizon's LTE coming Dec. 5
Verizon aims to keep LTE premium service as long as possible
Seidenberg: LTE no substitution for wired broadband

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