AT&T launches new U-verse, wireless bundle

AT&T introduced a new "buy two, get one free" offer for its U-verse TV customers that includes wireless service, something the company has positioned as a play against cable companies by offering triple-play voice, TV and Internet options. The announcement comes just days after rival Verizon Communications unveiled a plan to more fully integrate its FiOS TV service with Verizon Wireless cell phones.

The new AT&T offer breaks down as follows: New U-verse customers who bundle U-verse TV with either AT&T wireless service (a Nation 450 plan or above, for new or renewing customers) or U-verse Voice Unlimited will also get U-verse broadband service free for six months. AT&T said that amounts to a $30 monthly savings, or $180 over the six months.

AT&T said the offer is available now in U-verse markets in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin, and will be made available to all U-verse markets in the coming weeks.

Verizon last week announced an application that will turn Verizon Wireless phones into remote controls for the carrier's FiOS TV service. The catch though is that handsets with the application will have to access WiFi, something only a handful of Verizon handsets can do.

But Verizon and AT&T aren't the only giant telecoms working to mash wireless with wireline service. Both Comcast and Time Warner are adding mobile WiMAX to their service mixes, with various levels of bundled savings. And rival Cablevision is building a WiFi network in select areas on the East Coast.

For more:
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