DeviceAnywhere: BlackBerry dominates device testing

LAS VEGAS--Application testing firm DeviceAnywhere released the first installment of its new monthly research report the company said will provide insight into what operating systems and devices its customers are testing. The company said the statistics are based on data derived from the DeviceAnywhere system. The company provides access to more than 2,000 handsets deployed across two dozen carrier networks. More than 350,000 handset testing hours were logged in the DeviceAnywhere Test Center in 2009.

Not surprisingly, the company found that smartphone testing is increasing rapidly compared with feature phone testing. In January 2010, smartphone testing made up 49.5 percent of total testing time, compared with 35.9 percent in January 2009. Of those smartphones tested, the Research in Motion BlackBerry operating system was the most prevalent, accounting for seven of the top 10 devices tested and 14 of the top 20 devices. BlackBerry testing accounted for 28.9 percent of all testing across all devices, and the BlackBerry Bold (9000) was the most tested device in January 2010.

Nevertheless, other operating systems are gaining steam, particularly Google's Android. DeviceAnywhere said Android now is the fourth most tested operating system in the DeviceAnywhere Test Center, and that the T-Mobile G1 handset is the most tested device on the T-Mobile Virtual Developer Lab. Meanwhile, Microsoft's Windows Mobile operating system has seen a fairly substantial decline. Time spent on the Windows Mobile OS declined from 26.5 percent in January 2009 to 16.2 percent in January 2010.

For more:
- see this release

Related Articles:
DeviceAnywhere introduces self-certification app program
Zed taps DeviceAnywhere for mobile content testing
DeviceAnywhere debuts Motorola Virtual Lab
DeviceAnywhere adds Android G1 to test database
DeviceAnywhere adds BlackBerry to app dev services

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