Dolly Parton, musicians croon: delay white-space vote

Dolly Parton, the country music star and actress has waded into the debate over whether or not white-space spectrum (spectrum that sits between airwaves currently licensed to TV broadcasters) should be used for unlicensed wireless applications and devices. Parton is against the idea, joining others such as the megachurch pastor Joel Osteen, who argue that opening up white-space spectrum would cause interference for wireless microphones. The FCC is set to vote on the issue Nov. 4.

Parton said in a letter she sent to the five FCC commissioners that she was adding her name to a list of those supporting the National Association of Broadcasters in calling for a delay of the vote to have more public comment. Among the performances and venues that Parton said could be affected by the decision included the musical 9 to 5, Dollywood performances and events sponsored by the Grand Ol Opry. Parton contended that the entertainment industry could be adversely affected by the decision at a time when the country's economy is already weak.

Charlotte St. Martin, the executive director of the Broadway League, applauded Parton's filing. "The Broadway community is extremely appreciative that someone with Dolly Parton's multi-faceted talent and worldwide commercial endeavors has reached out to the FCC urging the commissioners to remain committed to protecting countless businesses and industries that have thrived on wireless microphone use for decades," she said in a statement. 

Meanwhile, a coalition of more than 100 artists and musicians also have sent a letter to the FCC echoing Parton's claims.

For more:
-see Parton's letter
-see the musicans' letter

Related Articles:
Pastor Joel Osteen joins white spaces debate
Professional sports leagues concerned about white space spectrum

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