Intel will ship chipsets in Honeycomb-based tablets; T-Mobile to start selling G-Slate

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@FierceWireless: RT @engadget: BlackBerry PlayBook pried open, gyroscope and other goodies discovered. Article [email protected]

> Intel will ship its Oak Trail chipsets in tablets running the Honeycomb version of Google's Android platform. Article

> Research In Motion's BlackBerry "Bridge" application for its PlayBook tablet is not yet working for AT&T BlackBerry subscribers. Article

> T-Mobile USA started selling the LG G-Slate, LG G2X and Sidekick 4G. Article

> A Houston grandmother became the first user of a prototype white space access point. Article

> Clearwire, Comcast and Sprint Nextel expanded their mobile WiMAX coverage in the Washington, D.C., metro area. Release

> Samsung is coming closer to challenging Intel for the top chipmaker spot, according to IHS iSuppli. Article

> Acer created a new business unit focused on mobile devices. Article

> FCC Commissioner Michael Copps said his chief of staff will join the GSMA. Article

> AT&T Mobility confirmed that Windows Phone 7 updates are going out to the LG Quantum and Samsung Focus. Post

Mobile Content News

> Apple is cracking down on iPhone and iPad applications that offer incentives--e.g., virtual currency--to encourage consumers to download other apps. Article

> According to comScore, Apple's iOS is by far the dominant platform, with twice the reach of Android. Article

> Skype issued a new version of its Android application that patches a security flaw identified in the previous iteration. Article

> eBay will acquire location-based media and discovery solutions provider WHERE. Article

And finally... A new University of Michigan study found that the more people use their smartphones in public to read the news, the more likely they are to talk to strangers while doing so. Article

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