Motorola on the prowl for mobile chief

At an investor conference yesterday Motorola CEO Greg Brown defended his company's decision to go public with the news that the company was mulling its strategic options for its mobile devices unit. Brown told the attendees that the reasoning was quite strategic: Acknowledging the flagging unit's troubles in public was a move "to stimulate alternative situations and partnerships," Brown said. In other words, it might have drawn out some acquisition bids. Also, the public admission of hard times was a way to attract talent to the business, according to Brown. Motorola has undertaken a full-time search for a mobile devices leader since Brown replaced Stu Reed as the day-to-day manager of the unit. The company is also on the lookout for other, lower-level talent to re-energize the group.

"In fairness to Stu, he inherited a very difficult situation and he needed help," Brown told the attendees. The CEO said he currently spends about 80 percent or more of his time on the mobile devices unit, but the recovery of that business will be "primarily product portfolio led."

For more on Motorola's talent search:
- tune into the analyst call here 

Related:
Motorola's buyer woes Video
Moto: We need more time to fix handset unit Article
Zander goes, but Moto's troubles remain Article
Motorola should keep its phone Opinion

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