Nokia expands WING with 4 vertical packages

Nokia sign at MWC18
The off-the-shelf IoT packages are built on the Nokia Worldwide IoT Network Grid (WING) infrastructure. (Fierce Wireless)

Nokia is trying to make it easier for operators to get new business in vertical IoT markets by offering packages designed to simplify the setup and operations of enterprise IoT services.

Timed to launch before Mobile World Congress (MWC) later this month in Barcelona, the off-the-shelf IoT packages are built on the Nokia Worldwide IoT Network Grid (WING) infrastructure that provides global IoT connectivity and services support.

The four new solutions include Smart Agriculture as-a-Service, Livestock Management as-a-Service, Logistics as-a-Service and Asset Management as-a-Service.

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“The IoT is a growing opportunity for operators to win new enterprise customers and significant additional revenue in a diverse range of vertical markets,” said Ankur Bhan, global head of WING Business at Nokia, in a statement. “With minimal upfront investment, an operator can now quickly get a service to market and generate IoT revenues. We expect these vertical solutions to encourage more operators to connect to Nokia WING, expanding its global footprint and broadening the range of capabilities and services that will become available.”

RELATED: Nokia unveils worldwide IoT network grid as a service

Nokia said it’s conducting trials of Agriculture as-a-Service with an unnamed African operator and working with a leading services and consulting firm on Asset Management as-a-Service to help them offer more advanced services.

Bhan added that Nokia already has several more vertically focused as-a-Service packages in the development pipeline.

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