Nokia may create new classes of devices

Nokia has registered the trademarks for several new possible "series," or classes of devices, giving rise to speculation that the company may begin producing new types of mobile products aimed at different market segments.

The website of the Office of Harmonization for the Internal Market posted details of Nokia's new trademark efforts, which includes the Cseries, the Xseries and something called Booklet. However, simply because Nokia has registered the trademarks does not mean the handset maker will use them.   

Nokia already has several series of devices. The company's Nseries smartphones target consumers, and its Eseries is focused mostly on enterprise users. Nokia also has high-end, Vertu-branded phones. A blog post by Juniper Research speculated that the Cseries may be aimed at low-cost consumers, while the Xseries could focus on mid-range devices.

The Juniper Research post also said that one of the trademarked classes may refer to devices Nokia may be creating with Intel. The companies were vague about their plans when they announced a partnership to create new mobile devices in June. However, the two said at the time that they wanted to define "a new mobile platform beyond today's smartphones, notebooks and netbooks" for hardware, software and mobile Internet services. Indeed, the Booklet moniker may refer to Nokia's long-rumored plans to produce netbook-type devices.

A Nokia spokeswoman did not respond to requests for comment at deadline.

For more:
- see this Juniper Research analysis
- see this IntoMobile post

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Nokia, Intel enter into tech alliance
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