Rogers changes iPhone pricing amid consumer complaints

Rogers Communications gave in to all of those angry Canadians--sort of. The company announced yesterday that it would alter its data pricing plans that outraged thousands of Canadian consumers so much that they signed an open letter to Apple CEO Steve Jobs asking him to use his influence and do something about Rogers' price gouging.

Rogers has lowered its per month pricing plan for data access, which has been a major gripe of Canadian consumers. Plans now start at $30 per month for 6 gigabytes of data transmission. For some, however, it's not enough, especially given the fact that Rogers is only offering such pricing until Aug. 31.

Late last month, Rogers said that customers who purchase the 3G iPhone would have to sign a mandatory three-year contract and the company would cap data usage at 750 MB. Although both AT&T and Rogers were offering calling, data and text messaging for $75 a month, Rogers at that price gave Canadians a third less calling time, half as many text messages and put that cap on 3G data usage that included steep fees for users who go over their monthly limit.

According to The Wall Street Journal, Rogers said that it initially didn't have a lot of information about how customers wanted to use the new 3G iPhone. As that information became available, it became clear that customers were eager to use the device's data capabilities to the fullest potential, so it responded with yesterday's price change. RCR Wireless News, however, reported that Apple had responded to consumer complaints by pulling devices and not allowing Canadian Apple Retail stores to sell the new iPhone.

For more:
- check out The Wall Street Journal (sub. req.)
- read RCR Wireless News

Related stories:
Why can't Rogers offer unlimited data pricing for the iPhone 3G?
iPhone: rumors and consumer rebellion

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