Rumor Mill: Motorola will launch Android tablet in November

Motorola (NYSE:MOT) will release a 10-inch tablet in November running version 3.0 of Google's Android platform, according to a report on The Street.com. The report, citing Rodman & Renshaw analyst Ashok Kumar, did not provide any specifications.

The handset vendor has hinted in the past that it plans to jump into the tablet market. In May, Moto co-CEO Sanjay Jha said at an investor conference sponsored by Barclays Capital that Motorola is thinking about a "companion product" to a TV that would sport a 7-10 inch screen and that would allow users to walk around their house and watch TV. Motorola also showed off a prototype Android tablet earlier this year as part of a demonstration of Verizon Wireless' (NYSE:VZ) forthcoming LTE network.

"We're very focused on participating in this convergence between mobility and home, and I actually think you will see some products from us in a very short period of time," Jha said during the investor conference. Jha will lead Motorola's handset division and its set-top box unit in a new company called Motorola Mobility once the company splits early next year.

A Motorola spokeswoman declined to comment.

Details about Android 3.0, which is code-named Gingerbread, have been spreading across the Web. The Android blog Phandroid posted what it said was a picture of an Android phone running 3.0.

For more:
- see this The Street.com video
- see this Slashgear post
- see this Phandroid post

Related Articles:
Motorola's Jha: Android will eclipse Apple's iPhone
Motorola jazzed by continued Droid demand
Motorola gives more breakup details ahead of split
Motorola plans tablet, follow-up to Droid

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