Rumor Mill: Verizon nixed Nokia Windows Phone over LTE concerns

Verizon Wireless (NYSE:VZ) decided to drop plans to launch a Nokia (NYSE:NOK) smartphone running Microsoft's (NASDAQ:MSFT) Windows Phone software, according to an article from The Verge.

The report, citing an unnamed source familiar with Verizon's plans, said that the carrier cancelled the phone over concerns about Windows Phone's support for Verizon's LTE network. The report also said that AT&T Mobility's (NYSE:T) impending launch of the LTE-enabled Lumia 900 may have contributed to Verizon's decision. Both AT&T and Verizon use 700 MHz spectrum for their LTE networks, but the two companies operate on different band classes for LTE.

Representatives from Verizon and Nokia declined to comment.

According to the Verge article, Verizon is unlikely to launch new Windows Phones until a new version of the software, Windows Phone 8, dubbed "Apollo," is ready later this year. The new platform will allow support for multi-core processors, NFC and four different screen sizes, according to a Microsoft video that leaked last month.

A lack of support from Verizon could hinder Nokia's attempts to re-enter the U.S. market. Chris Weber, the head of Nokia's operations in the Americas, has said Verizon is an important carrier partner for Nokia.

For more:
- see this The Verge article

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