Sega Mobile on track with Olympics games

Game publisher Sega Mobile announced an agreement with International Sports Management, the exclusive licensee of International Olympic Committee, to develop Sonic at the Olympic Games and Beijing 2008: The Official Mobile Game of the Olympic Games, both of which will be available across major wireless carriers worldwide in conjunction with the upcoming Summer Olympics. While Beijing 2008: The Official Mobile Game of the Olympic Games enables players to compete in four events--the 100m, Hammer Throw, 200m Freestyle and Table Tennis--in both Quick Start and Go for the Gold! modes, Sonic at the Olympic Games features the popular videogame hedgehog in five events, including the 1500m, 400m Hurdles, Triple Jump Discus and Javelin. Sega already boasts a successful relationship with the IOC: Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games, developed for the Wii and Nintendo DS platforms, have already sold in excess of 5 million copies worldwide in three months of release

In addition, Sega Mobile announced the remainder of its 2008 portfolio, spotlighting mobile editions of popular titles like Sega Columns Deluxe, Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and Crazy Taxi. Perhaps most notable is the publisher's first game for Apple's iPhone, Super Monkey Ball. "We're very excited about the iPhone and what Apple is bringing to the table--it's a big step forward in delivering premium content on the wireless platform," said Sega Mobile marketing director Carrie Cowan in an interview with FierceMobileContent. "For Super Monkey Ball, our developer team spent two weeks with the iPhone SDK, and fundamentally, the platform represents the next evolution of wireless gaming. It enables things even handheld gaming devices can't do, like tilting and twisting the device. It adds a dimension to gaming we haven't seen before."

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