Sprint fills in Android's lower end with Samsung Intercept

Sprint Nextel (NYSE:S) is filling out its Android smartphone lineup a little more this summer through the launch of its latest device running on Google's mobile platform, the Samsung Intercept.

Click here for Samsung Intercept pictures and details.Like T-Mobile USA yesterday with the announcement of the Motorola (NYSE:MOT) Charm, Sprint is adding a lower-end Android model to its range of Android gadgets. The Intercept is an update from the Samsung Moment, which Sprint launched in the fall. The Intercept features Android 2.1, a 3.2-inch touchscreen, slide-out Qwerty keyboard and a 3.2-megapixel camera. Curiously, the Intercept has a an EV-DO Rev. 0 radio, which delivers slower data speeds than the EV-DO Rev. A radio found in most Sprint 3G devices.

The Intercept will be available July 11 for $99.99 with a two-year contract and after a $100 mail-in rebate.

The device sits on the low end of Sprint's recent Android announcements. Last month Sprint announced its version of the Samsung Galaxy S called the Epic 4G. It is Samsung's first WiMAX-powered handset and Sprint's second, after the Android-powered HTC Evo. Like the other variants of the Galaxy S, the device runs Android 2.1 and sports a 1 GHz Samsung Hummingbird processor, 4-inch Super AMOELD screen and 5-megapixel camera. However, unlike other versions, it also offers a full Qwerty keyboard and a front-facing camera for video chatting. Sprint and Samsung did not release a specific release date or pricing on the gadget.

For more:
- see this release
- see this Engadget post

Related Articles:
Motorola hopes to charm T-Mobile subs with new Android phone
Samsung unleashes slew of Galaxy S Android phones
Sprint can't get enough HTC Evos
Sprint launching HTC Evo June 4 for $199

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