Sprint replaces Crull with Solé as CMO in front-office shuffle

Sprint (NYSE: S) moved forward with its "One Sprint" strategy, naming Roger Solé as its new chief marketing officer and placing former CMO Kevin Crull in charge of its central U.S. region.

Solé

A former Bell Media executive, Crull was brought on as CMO in May and oversaw Sprint initiatives such as All-In, iPhone Forever and the recent 50 percent off campaign. He will now serve as president of Sprint's central region, which encompasses states including Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, Wisconsin and the Dakotas.

Solé is a Sprint senior vice president of advertising and acquisition, Hispanic market and innovation, as well as president of Puerto Rico. He has also overseen Pinsight Media, Sprint's mobile advertising division, and the startup-mentorship program Sprint Accelerator.

Both Crull and Solé will report to CEO Marcelo Claure.

"Our One Sprint initiative will place us closer to our customers and allow our company to provide them with a much better experience," Claure said in a prepared statement.

The moves are part of a larger sales-organization shakeup though which Sprint will create four regional hubs with sales teams focusing on 19 regional markets rather than segmenting users through a nationwide lens. The front-office shuffle comes as Sprint prepares to slash thousands of jobs in an effort to save the company as much as $2.5 billion.

"The priority is pretty simple," CFO Tarek Robbiati said of Sprint's strategy for 2016 at an investor conference earlier this week. "It's cost cuts, cost cuts, and then cost cuts. We simply have to stop doing things that make no sense."

For more:
- see this Sprint press release

Related articles:
Sprint to move to 4 regional hubs model, streamline sales organization as part of restructuring
Sprint brings in former Bell Media exec Kevin Crull as its new CMO
Sprint's Claure remakes leadership team with foreign talent in turnaround push

Suggested Articles

The FCC today voted unanimously to advance a proposal to reallocate the 5.9 GHz band to both unlicensed and C-V2X technologies.

Raymond James lowered its odds of the T-Mobile/Sprint deal getting approved from 85% to 55%.

The last of a six-part series attempts to round up the observations and the roadmap for the coming decade.