T-Mobile fails to explain its 4-hour outage

T-Mobile is pretty focused, for now, on closing its $26.5 billion merger with Sprint. (Pixabay)

T-Mobile customers across the country couldn’t make calls or send text messages for about four hours yesterday, confirms the carrier. The T-Mobile outage began around 6 pm ET and was resolved by about 10:30 pm ET.

Our own FierceWireless senior editor Monica Alleven said, “I was able to get texts and calls during the time of the outage yesterday with T-Mobile, so it didn't affect every subscriber.” 

According to a report from TechCruch, the outage seemed to affect some subscribers’ texts and voice service, but it did not affect their mobile data.”

SPONSORED BY MAXAR

How is cloud computing and AI driving the evolution of next-gen wireless networks?

Explore the opportunities presented by cloud computing and AI technologies and hear from Maxar on game-changing solutions in the race to 5G.

In response to a number of questions from FierceWireless about cause and location of the outage and the number of customers affected, a T-Mobile spokesperson referred us to two tweets that didn’t provide any details: one from T-Mobile CEO John Legere and one from CTO Neville Ray:

A spokesperson for Verizon took the opportunity to give a tweet jab to T-Mobile:

These kinds of mobile outages are relatively rare. Earlier this summer AT&T suffered a nationwide service outage for about two hours that prevented AT&T cellphone customers from calling 911 or sending text messages.

RELATED: AT&T suffers nationwide 911 service outage

T-Mobile is pretty focused, for now, on closing its $26.5 billion merger with Sprint. Its top executives have been spending their time on the phone with FCC commissioners to propel the deal.

RELATED: T-Mobile execs dial up FCC chair, commissioners

Legere joked on the carriers’ most recent earnings call, saying “For the foreseeable past, Mike [Sievert] and I have spent every day in Washington, D.C., only briefly calling back to Matt [Staneff, the company's CMO] to see how the business was going, and the business had all-time record results,” according to a Seeking Alpha transcript.

Suggested Articles

AT&T is finally opening up 5G service to consumers, announcing Tuesday the first cities for its upcoming 5G launch using low-band spectrum.

It's a long and winding road, but there is a connection between the C-band proceedings and spectrum held by Dish Network.

Charter is also considering the use of its distributed wireline assets to help with small cell placements.