The top 5 wireless ads: Vote for your favorite spot from T-Mobile, Verizon and more from February

Verizon launched an advertising campaign around its new unlimited data plan. Image: Verizon

FierceWireless has partnered with iSpot.tv, the real-time TV ad measurement company with attention analytics from 10 million smart TV screens, to bring you a monthly snapshot of the wireless industry's advertising spending. The results below are for the top five biggest spenders among wireless industry brands from Feb. 1-28.

Further, this time around you can vote on which of these ads you think is the best and most effective. Scroll down below the list to vote on your favorite ad.

There was a huge jump in spending throughout the wireless industry for February compared to January, with fat budgets for the Super Bowl and the Oscars in particular. In total, 20 brands spent an estimated $302.5 million on 113 national TV ad spots that aired over 50,700 times. T-Mobile and Verizon were neck-in-neck for spending, with the former edging out the latter.

(Check out how these numbers compare with MayJuneJulyAugustSeptemberOctober, November and December.)

Here are the top five advertisers in the wireless industry during the month of February, and their top ads:

1. T-Mobile

The T-Mobile ad with the most spend (est. $17.4 million): “T-Mobile One & Device: Better Than a Tax Holiday

Here are some other key facts about T-Mobile's spending in February:

  • spent an estimated $73.8 million on 18 spots that ran nearly 8,500 times

  • generated 1.3 billion TV ad impressions

  • spent the most on these networks: Fox, ABC and NBC

  • spent the most on this programming: Super Bowl LI, Law & Order: Special Victims Unit and College Basketball

2. Verizon

The Verizon ad with the most spend (est. $31.8 million): “Drop the Mic

Here are some other key facts about Verizon's spending in February:

  • spent an estimated $70.5 million on eight spots that ran over 8,400 times

  • generated 1.2 billion TV ad impressions

  • spent the most on these networks: ABC, CBS and NBC

  • spent the most on this programming: the Oscars, College Basketball and NBA Basketball

3. AT&T

The AT&T ad with the most spend (est. $29.9 million): “Everywhere

Here are some other key facts about AT&T's spending in February:

  • spent an estimated $53.3 million on 15 spots that ran over 8,200 times

  • generated 1.1 billion TV ad impressions

  • spent the most on these networks: CBS, ABC and NBC

  • spent the most on this programming: College Basketball, the Oscars and the 59th Annual Grammy Awards

4. Sprint

The Sprint ad with the most spend (est. $12.9 million): “Extreme Measures

Here are some other key facts about Sprint's spending in February:

  • spent an estimated $36.4 million on 15 spots that ran over 7,600 times

  • generated 1 billion TV ad impressions

  • spent the most on these networks: Fox, NBC and ABC

  • spent the most on this programming: Super Bowl LI, College Basketball and The Walking Dead

5. Straight Talk

The Straight Talk Wireless ad with the most spend (est. $10.8 million): “Apple iPhone: Bunny

Here are some other key facts about Straight Talk's spending in February:

  • spent an estimated $19.5 million on two spots that ran over 2,600 times

  • generated nearly 526 million TV ad impressions

  • spent the most on these networks: CBS, NBC and ABC

  • spent the most on this programming: NBA Basketball, Modern Family and NCIS



iSpot's data does not include co-promotions or local market data. Click here for more on iSpot.tv's methodology.

The company's software leverages proprietary audio and video fingerprinting algorithms to automatically identify and extract TV commercials, movie trailers and show promos.  

The company tracks hundreds of millions of explicit interactions with TV ads across roughly 100 million unique consumersThese interactions include video plays, searches and social activity. The company also analyzes online views across YouTube and iSpot.tv, searches on Google, Bing and Yahoo! and social activity on Facebook (including Facebook private views) and Twitter.

The company tags over 40 different dimensions of metadata, including brand, agency, actors, products, songs, moods, URLs and other pertinent data, to create its results.