Toshiba plans Android tablet; FCC's Kevin Martin lands at AirWalk

Quick news from across the Web

@FierceWireless RT @engadget: Isabella Products' USB stick connects unconnected digital photo frames. Article (Fierce 15: Article) | Follow @FierceWireless

> Shares in Motorola Mobility and Motorola Solutions rose in their first day of trading. Article

> The California Supreme Court ruled police have the right to search the mobile phones of those taken into custody. Article

> Research In Motion showed off the capabilities of its forthcoming PlayBook tablet. Article

> Toshiba plans to release an Android tablet. Article

> Hewlett-Packard scheduled a webOS event for Feb. 9. Post

> Asus announced a range of new tablets. Article

> Former FCC chief Kevin Martin joined the board of AirWalk Communications. Article

> ZTE's mobile phone shipments are set to increase to 120 million units this year. Article

> LG is planning to introduce a number of new handsets at the Consumer Electronics Show, including one dubbed Revolution and another one running LTE. Article

> A new Rolling Stone advertisement shows an HTC 4G smartphone for AT&T. Article

Mobile Content News

> Mobile Content Venture will partner with MobiTV to develop a suite of consumer applications slated to roll out as part of the MCV consumer launch in late 2011. Article

> Advertising spend across the mobile gaming segment will increase tenfold over the next five years. Article

> Online retail giant Amazon.com launched its Appstore Developer Portal, confirming long-rumored plans to roll out an Android application storefront later in 2011. Article

And finally... Nokia arms bloggers with N8 smartphones to cover CES. Post

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