Tropos intros software to better WiFi user experience

Tropos is debunking the notion that muni-WiFi networks require multiple radios to better the user experience. While its competitors continue to market the advantages of using multiple radios to increase performance and capacity in mesh networks, Tropos is continuing with a a single-radio solution and is increasing capacity and bettering user experience through software, said the company. As such, Tropos introduced today a mesh software solution called the Adaptive Mesh Connectivity Engine (AMCE) that runs on its MetroMesh routers and is designed to compensate for the wide variations in the WiFi devices that use metro-scale networks. AMCE is designed to provide adaptive tuning on each Tropos MetroMesh router that dynamically accommodates the broad range of WiFi clients used to access metro-scale mesh networks to provide reliable connectivity.

"This isn't our answer to the multi-radio debate because we don't think it's the right question," Ellen Kirk, vice president of marketing with Tropos, told FierceWireless. "If you keep throwing hardware out there, there is self-interference. That is not going to solve these problems in the long-run of the inability of WiFi clients to connect to the network... We have over 300 deployments and not a single network that has ever run out of capacity. We produce capacity in software."

For more about Tropos' AMCE software:
- see this release

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