What, Nokia worry? Google's G1 not a concern

Nokia has adopted the 'What, me worry?' attitude of Mad Magazine's Alfred E. Newman when it comes to Google's mightily hyped G1 Android-based mobile device which it introduced with T-Mobile this week. Perhaps exhibiting false bravado, Nokia's CEO Olli-Pekka Kallasvuo pointed out that Nokia owns the Symbian operating system that's already in 200 million devices and is making that platform open to an active community of developers and device manufacturers.

Kallasvuo based his confidence on the belief that "a mobile device is not enough anymore" and "the consumer wants a different type of service and experience on top of that." Nokia, which dominates the worldwide handset market has only about a 10 percent share of the frenzied U.S. market, in part, its critics contend, because the company has been more focused on building phones than mobile devices and has been late to appreciate the power of the mobile Internet.

Google, meanwhile, lives on the Web and made a big splash in the already turbulent handset pool with the T-Mobile G1, which runs on the open source Android operating system connecting it to the Internet and numerous developer apps.

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Related articles:
Nokia launches Calling All Innovators app contest. Article
Google, T-Mobile USA launch the G1 Android phone. Article

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