Everything Everywhere axes more management jobs

The purge within Everything Everywhere (EE) management continues with the announcement that another 22 directors and vice presidents will be made redundant. This action removes nearly 20 per cent of the 125 managers that report to the EE board.

Swantee

This latest headcount reduction in EE's top-heavy management structure follows a swiftly-conducted review instigated by the new CEO Olaf Swantee into how the company can be streamlined. Swantee was appointed this summer with the mandate to vigorously push ahead with the Orange UK/T-Mobile UK cost-cutting programme.

Of note, according to the Independent newspaper, the EE executives who retain their jobs have been told to review the size of their departments within six weeks and report on whether more staff numbers should be cut.

A spokesman for Everything Everywhere told Total Telecom: "The team we had at the time was the right team for the integration [of Orange UK and T-Mobile UK]... now we have to identify the right team that's going to move the business forward."

Separately, France Telecom (FT) Orange has signed a strategic framework deal with China Telecom to make the most of the complementary aspects of their networks and services

While the deal is largely focused on fixed-line wholesale agreements, the two firms plan to provide Wi-Fi roaming services in the future for each others' business customers. FT Orange told FierceWireless:Europe that this new partnership will build on its existing commercial arrangement in China and Asia, including its deal with China Unicom.

For more:
- see this Independent article
- see this Financial Times article (reg. req.)
- see this Total Telecom article
- see this FT Orange press release

Related Articles:
Everything Everywhere expected to cut more jobs
New Everything Everywhere CEO Swantee slashes management jobs
Everything Everywhere CEO Alexander quits days ahead of Q2 results
Everything Everywhere slashes 1,200 jobs; mulls LTE investment

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