Foxconn suicide problems underplayed

Foxconn’s suicide problem is worse than reported, as the firm’s plants are like modern-day prison camps, a leaked report reveals.
 
The report, compiled by 20 universities across Greater China, compared the firm’s production facilities to concentration camps, and calls for the Taiwan-headquartered firm to make radical changes to its culture and labor practices, Global Times reported.
 
Foxconn produces devices for big-name firms including Apple, Dell and HP.
 
Employees face verbal abuse and harsh punishments for a long list of named infringements. Around 50% of employees reported being subjected to some form of abuse, with 16% of cases allegedly perpetuated by supervisors or managers.
 
The authors also claim that Foxconn's employee suicide scandal was worse than reported, claiming at least 17 employees had tried to commit suicide since January compared to the 14 widely reported, SCMP.com said.
 
Foxconn also forces interns to work for ten or more hours, breaching Chinese law which limits the time to eight hours.
 
 
Interns do not sign a contract with Foxconn, and so are not eligible for social welfare payments or compensation for injuries.
 
The report also claims that Foxconn has been negligent with its safety standards. While Chinese law dictates that employees working with hazardous materials receive regular medical checkups, one employee claimed to have received medical support only twice in sixteen years at the firm.
 
A promised 30% pay hike has failed to come through, with one worker claiming to have seen only a 9% pay increase.
 
The fact that sites such as the Global Times received the report has led observers to believe that it had been leaked by the Chinese government.

Suggested Articles

Wireless operators can provide 5G services with spectrum bands both above and below 6 GHz—but that doesn't mean that all countries will let them.

Here are the stories we’re tracking today.

The 5G Mobile Network Architecture research project will implement two 5G use cases in real-world test beds.