Huawei taps 'selfie' trend with Ascend G6, launches wearables

BARCELONA, Spain - Huawei unveiled a raft of new devices on Sunday at the Mobile World Congress trade show, including a high end smartphone that taps into the latest fad for taking 'selfie' photos and posting them onto social networks, plus the Chinese vendor's first wearable device.

With the LTE-based Ascend G6, Huawei emphasised the 'fun' element of smartphones with a number of colours to choose from and a voice-activated hands-free selfie function to preview camera-ready poses.

The smartphone comes with a 4.5 inch HD display and five megapixel front-facing camera. The Ascend G6 will be available from the first quarter of 2014 and Ascend G6 4G from April 2014.

Huawei also unveiled two new additions to its MediaPad range of devices and its first wearable device: MediaPad X1, a seven inch LTE Cat4-enabled all-in-one phablet; TalkBand B1, a hybrid 'talk and track' companion; and MediaPad M1, an eight inch entertainment-focused device.

The MediaPad X1 is going to be available in China, Russia, Western Europe, the Middle East, Japan and Latin America from March 2014; TalkBand B1 is set to be available in China from March 2014, and in Japan, the Middle East, Russia and Western Europe from the second quarter 2014; and MediaPad M1 is available from the first quarter 2014 in Europe, Russia, the Middle East, China, Japan, Asia Pacific, Australia and Latin America.

The fifth product to be launched by Huawei in Barcelona was the LTE-based Mobile Wi-Fi hotspot, the E5786, which includes carrier integration for faster data speeds.

For more:
- see this press release on the Ascend G6
- see this separate press release on the MediaPad

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