Madrid university joins Google's massive book scan project

The Complutense University of Madrid will become the first library in a non-English-speaking country to join Google's bid to scan every book in print, as the controversial project extends its global reach, a Reuters report said.

The report said the university's library, the country's second largest behind the National Library, housed 3 million works, including thousands of Spanish-language public domain books, such as those of Cervantes and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz.

It also contained thousands of volumes in French, German, Latin, Italian and English, the report said.

More than 400 million people speak Spanish around the world.

Madrid joins Harvard, Oxford, Stanford, the universities of Michigan and California and the New York Public Library for the project being run by the world's most popular search company. The US Library of Congress is involved in a similar effort with Google.

The Internet giant is funding the scanning of titles as part of a nearly two-year-old effort to make the library collections searchable online, the report further said.

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