Multimedia usage climbs by 25% in six months, claims study

A poll of over 18,000 mobile phone consumers indicated that the increase in multimedia and picture messaging from feature phone users had surged by 25 per cent from just six months ago.

The survey, conducted by J.D. Power, found that both smartphone and traditional handset owners were increasingly using their phones for entertainment and sharing media with friends, family and members of their social network. The company identified that smartphone users were nearly twice as likely to share multimedia messages. In addition, nearly one-fifth (17 per cent) of smartphone owners with touch screen-equipped handsets indicated they frequently downloaded and watched video content on their device, which was significantly higher than the segment average.

The study also maintained that overall satisfaction among smartphone and traditional handset owners whose phones were equipped with touch screens was considerably higher than the satisfaction of owners of phones that have other input mechanisms - such as a text keyboard.

"Touch screens are ideal for those using their phone for entertainment, as the displays are generally larger and provide a richer viewing experience," said Kirk Parsons, director of wireless services at J.D. Power and Associates. "It is critical, however, that manufacturers meet expectations with regard to providing adequate battery life, as these large displays can drain batteries very quickly."

For more on this story:
Cellular News

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P2P traffic coming to forefront in 3G world

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