Nokia accelerates drive into content and services business

Having revealed that its Ovi apps store had already attracted thousands of developers and content providers wanting to sell their content in its online store, Nokia has also announced a slew of other service products in its fight-back against Apple and RIM.

Regardless of Nokia's view that Ovi could reach over 50 million consumers when it launches next month, the company seems determined to push forward on a wider front by providing services developed internally. Firstly, its Point & Find application--which allows people to access information and services through the Internet by pointing their mobile phone camera at "real-life" objects--has now entered into a Beta test phase in the UK and US.

In the UK, Turner Europe is using the service to allow users to point their camera phones at various Cartoon Network related objects to access show or product information on their phones. An additional edge to Point & Find, according to Nokia, is that it integrates GPS, thereby supporting location-based capabilities, such as the movie-finding service.

The firm also said it now supports Hotmail using the Nokia email messaging service, which would join Yahoo Mail, AOL Mail, Gmail, and others available on Nokia handsets.

Lastly, a prototype of the Nokia photo browser has been released that will enable users with new ways to browse photos. The app includes "Face browsing," which uses face detection technology to find people's faces from pictures and allows them to flick on them to view them more closely. Another feature is the "MagGlass" magnifier, which gives a magnifying glass effect for image zooming.

For more on this story:
Mobile News
, Mobile Today and Cellular News

Related stories:
N-Gage to remain outside of Ovi Store, for now -- or left to die
T-Mobile denies plot to dump Nokia Ovi devices
Nokia's Mail on Ovi public beta goes 'live' around the world
Nokia teams with Telenor on Ovi

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