O2 launches personalised mobile ad service

Having failed to gain the interest of consumers of major brands, O2 claims its latest mobile advertising initiative will revitalise the concept by allowing O2 subscribers to personalise what adverts they receive according to their particular interests.

The company claims that its O2 More service, launched today with around 50 brands, is the first of its kind to allow customers to opt-in to receive relevant marketing campaigns sent to their mobile in the form of a text message. Those opting in will not receive more than one advertising message per day which will offer discounts from high street retailers and restaurants, holiday offers and trials of new services and information.

Shaun Gregory, the MD of O2 Media--which devised the More service--said: "Mobile advertising has been slow to deliver on its promise. Much of that has been down to a lack of understanding, limited opportunities and no real accountability or measurement. O2 More is about to change all that and will spearhead the UK's first truly personalised media business."

The company claims that market research found that two-thirds of its customers would subscribe to such a service. "We have designed a permission-based marketing opportunity that delivers true engagement and relevance. Because customers opt in we can deliver truly relevant content that provides an experience and a richer opportunity for marketers. With 50 brands on board already, it's clear that the advertising market is as excited about O2 More as we are," said Gregory.

O2 said that More would support additional marketing services next year, including advertising messages based upon customers' phone usage and location data.

For more on this story:
Mobile News

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